Zhixian's Tech Blog

2015-10-23

Setup Ubuntu (Trusty Tahr) for development

Filed under: development, ubuntu — Tags: , , , , — Zhixian @ 11:18:10 am

This blog post is on my setting up another Ubuntu Server VM.
This time I want a VM that has the common software development applications pre-installed.
As such most of the steps are similar to what I did in a previous blog post.
So on this blog post, I will start from the screen where I can select pre-packaged software.

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Although, I was not really sure I really need the DNS server and print server, I thought “Ah well. Might as well.”
So they are included.

Setup MySql

First thing to setup is to assign a password for MySql server “root” account.
Note: You may have notice that background color have changed from purple to blue.
This was because I typed the wrong confirmation password when setting the password.

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Setup E-mail

 

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2015-10-11

Setting up Ubuntu 14.04 Server on VirtualBox

Filed under: computing, ubuntu — Tags: , , , , — Zhixian @ 17:15:10 pm

This is a blog post that describes my setup of Ubuntu Server 14.04 (Trusty Tahr) on VirtualBox.
I intended to use this server for local software development.

Selected Software Package Description
OpenSSH server Needed for remote secure shell sessions
LAMP Linux Apache MySql PHP development stack
PostgreSQL database Best open-source database
Samba file server File sharing
Skipped Software Packages Description
DNS server Don’t really think I need it
Mail server I will describe this in a later blog post
Print server Don’t really think I need it
Tomcat Java Server Not sure if I want to use this;

 

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2015-01-03

Installing Postgresql using installer from EnterpriseDB on Ubuntu

Filed under: computing — Tags: , , , , , , , — Zhixian @ 17:23:01 pm

This blog post describes installing Postgresql 9.4 and pgAdmin III 1.20.0 using the installer provided by EnterpriseDB.

Background (Or lessons learnt)

I recently installed a copy of Postgresql on Ubuntu based on instructions from the official web site (http://www.postgresql.org/download/linux/ubuntu/).
Unfortunately, the copy of pgAdmin III (a graphical UI to manage Postgresql databases) is outdated.
The version of Postgresql installed was 9.4 but the version of pgAdmin installed was 1.18.1 which has warnings issued when I connect to the database.

pgAdmin III_168

So I decide to do the next best thing mentioned in the page – use the installer from EnterpriseDB in hopes that they have packaged the latest copy of pgAdmin III.

PostgreSQL: Linux downloads (Ubuntu) - Google Chrome_171

Assumptions

I assumed you know how to start a terminal session and execute commands in it.

Summary of Steps

  1. Download Installer
  2. Making Installer executable
  3. Execute the Installer

Download Installer

Clicking the download link in the previous screen shot will bring me to the EnterpriseDB’s Postgresql install download page (http://www.enterprisedb.com/products-services-training/pgdownload).

Because I’m running the 64-bit version of Ubuntu, I clicked on the “Linux x86-64” button to download the installer.

Download PostgreSQL | EnterpriseDB - Google Chrome_172

After you clicked the button, you will be brought to a thank-you page.
Wait for the download to complete.

Thank you for downloading PostgreSQL! | EnterpriseDB - Google Chrome_173

After the download has complete, your download folder should look like the below.

Downloads_174

Making Installer executable

By default, the downloaded file is not executable by double-clicking it.
Attempts to do so, will result in the below dialog:

Untitled window_175

Click on the No button to close the dialog.

To make the downloaded file executable:

1. Start a terminal session and navigate to folder where you saved the downloaded installer.

zhixian@SARA: ~-Downloads_176

2. Run the following command. Replace the text in bold if necessary if you are not using Ubuntu 64-bit.

chmod +x ./postgresql-9.4.0-1-linux-x64.run

zhixian@SARA: ~-Downloads_177

Execute the installer

Now you can execute the installer. From the terminal session, run the following command start the installation wizard:

sudo ./postgresql-9.4.0-1-linux-x64.run

zhixian@SARA: ~-Downloads_180

You will see the welcome screen of the installation wizard.
Click on Next button to proceed to the next step of the installation wizard.

Setup (as superuser)_181

The installation wizard should prompt you for the location to install Postgresql.
Click on Next button to accept the default and proceed to the next step of the installation wizard.

Setup (as superuser)_182

The installation wizard will now prompt you for the directory to store data for Postgresql.
Click on Next button to accept the default and proceed to the next step of the installation wizard.

Setup (as superuser)_183

The installation wizard will now prompt you for a password to the postgres account.
This account is use for starting Postgresql.
Enter your desired password for this account.
Click on Next button to accept the default and proceed to the next step of the installation wizard.

Setup (as superuser)_184

The installation process will then prompt you for a port number that Postgresql will use to host the database server.
Click on Next button to accept the default and proceed to the next step of the installation wizard.

Note The default port that Postgresql use is 5432. However, this port is all in used by the first instance of Postgresql that I installed previously the installation wizard picked the next available port 5433. I accepted the defaults in the screen shot below planning to uninstall the first instance of Postgres and then reconfigure this instance of Postgresql to use port 5432.

Setup (as superuser)_185

The installation wizard will now prompt you for the locale that your database will use.
Click on Next button to accept the default and proceed to the next step of the installation wizard.

Setup (as superuser)_186

The installation will now declare that it has all the information need to install Postgresql.
Click on Next button to accept the default and proceed with installing Postgresql.

Setup (as superuser)_187

The installation wizard will start to install Postgresql.
Wait for the installation process to complete.

Setup (as superuser)_188

After the installation process has complete, you will see the below screen.
Click on Finish button to exit the installer.

Note If you not need to download and install additional software, uncheck the option to start Stack Builder at exit.

Setup (as superuser)_189

After you exit the installation wizard, you should be able to see the Postgresql that you just installed from the desktop menu.

Workspace 1_195

Note If you do not see the menu item, you may need to re-login or restart your system.

The pgadmin installed should be version 1.20 and should work fine with Postgresql 9.4.

2014-12-31

How to Install Postgresql onto Ubuntu (Trusty Tahr)

Filed under: computing — Tags: , , , , , — Zhixian @ 00:08:12 am

This blog post describes how I install Postgresql 9.4 onto Ubuntu.

You may want to following this blog post, Installing Postgresql using installer from EnterpriseDB on Ubuntu instead.
The below blog post will install latest version of Postgresql at this time of writing (version 9.4).
Unfortunately, the graphical interface tool installed pgAdmin III that is installed with this set of instructions uses an older version of pgAdmin III (version 1.18.1 at this time of writing).
This version does not support Postgresql 9.4.

Summary

  1. Create Repository List File
  2. Import Signing Key
  3. Update apt-get
  4. Install Postgresql
  5. Install Additional Modules

Create Repository List File

Create the repository list file using the following command:

echo "deb http://apt.postgresql.org/pub/repos/apt/ trusty-pgdg main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/pgdg.list

zhixian@SARA: ~_161

Import Signing Key

Import signing key for Postgresql by running the following command:

wget --quiet -O - https://www.postgresql.org/media/keys/ACCC4CF8.asc | sudo apt-key add -

zhixian@SARA: ~_162

Update apt-get

Run the following command to update your apt-get.

sudo apt-get update

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Install Postgresql

Run the following command:

sudo apt-get install postgresql-9.4

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Install Additional Modules

The installation above is quite bare-bones. It does not provide a graphical tool or development libraries.
To add them, run the following command:

sudo apt-get install postgresql-contrib-9.4 pgadmin3 libpq-dev postgresql-server-dev-9.4

postgresql-contrib-9.4 – additional supplied modules
libpq-dev – libraries and headers for C language frontend development
postgresql-server-dev-9.4 – libraries and headers for C language backend development
pgadmin3 – pgAdmin III graphical administration utility

zhixian@SARA: ~_165

After installation have complete, you can find the graphical tool under Applications > Programming > pgAdmin III from the desktop menu.

Workspace 1_166

Reference

Linux downloads (Ubuntu) (http://www.postgresql.org/download/linux/ubuntu/)

2014-12-28

How to install Mono on Ubuntu

Filed under: web application development — Tags: , , , , , — Zhixian @ 01:29:12 am

This blog post describes my installation steps to get Mono running on my Ubuntu.

I will write another blog post on testing this installation.

Assumptions

  1. You have Apache HTTP Server installed
  2. You know how to start a terminal session and run commands there.

Summary

  1. Add Mono Project GPG signing key
  2. Add Mono Package Repository
  3. Add mod_mono Repository
  4. Update package cache
  5. Install Mono
  6. Install mod_mono
  7. Enable mod_mono
  8. Reference

Mono Project GPG signing key

This step adds the GPG signing key to your key-ring.
This signing key is used to make sure the installed files are valid.
To add the key to your key ring, start a terminal session and run the following command:

sudo apt-key adv –keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com –recv-keys 3FA7E0328081BFF6A14DA29AA6A19B38D3D831EF

zhixian@SARA: ~_120

Add Mono Package Repository

This step add the Mono package repository into apt-get list of available package repositories.
Enter the following command at the command-line of the terminal session:

echo "deb http://download.mono-project.com/repo/debian wheezy main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mono-xamarin.list

zhixian@SARA: ~_121

Add mod_mono Repository

This step adds the repository for mod_mono to apt-get list of available package repositories.
mod_mono is use by Apache HTTP server to interpret .NET web pages.
To add the repository, run the following command at the command-line:

echo “deb http://download.mono-project.com/repo/debian wheezy-apache24-compat main” | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mono-xamarin.list

zhixian@SARA: ~_124

Update package cache

To update the apt-get package cache to use the repositories that you just added, run the following command at the command-line:

apt-get update

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Install Mono

To install the complete Mono package enter the following at the command-line:

sudo apt-get install mono-complete

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After the initial listing of the packages that will be installed, you will be given a prompt asking if you would like to proceed install Mono. Enter “Y” to proceed with the installation process.

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Install mod_mono

Run the following command to add mod_mono:

sudo apt-get install libapache2-mod-mono

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You might see an error exit status at the end of the installation process.
This is due to some configuration issue in the installation process.
I’m not too sure what exactly is the issue but it seems fine to ignore it.

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Enable mod_mono

mod_mono is enabled by running the following command:

sudo a2enmod mod_mono

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Reference

http://www.mono-project.com/docs/getting-started/install/linux/

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ModMono

2014-12-21

Google App Engine development on Ubuntu for Python (Part 2 of 2)

Filed under: web application development — Tags: , , , , , — Zhixian @ 23:46:12 pm

This blog post describes how to run Google App Engine (GAE for short) on Ubuntu.
This is the second part of a 2-part blog post.
This blog post focus on writing a simple (helloworld) application just to demonstrate that the setup works and that we can deploy our application.

Parts

  1. Setting up Google App Engine SDK
  2. Running Google App Engine (this article)

An aside related article, How to Add Google App Engine project to Google Developers Console.

Assumptions

This blog post builds on the previous blog post Setting up Google App Engine SDK and assumes that you have followed the instructions there.

This blog post also assumes you know how to register a Google App Engine project in the Google Developers Console.
If you need help with this, you can take a look at my blog post, How to Add Google App Engine project to Google Developers Console.

Part 2 Summary

  1. Create project folders (opinionated)
  2. Create request handler
  3. Create configuration file
  4. Test project
  5. Deploying project

Create Project Directory

(Opinionated) I usually store my projects in a Projects folder in my home folder.

zhixian_084

Inside this Projects folder, right-click the folder area to display the context menu.
Click Create Folder from the context menu.

zhixian@SARA: ~-Projects_085

Name the folder HelloWorld.
So your Projects folder, should look like the below.
The files (request handler and configuration) will be stored inside the HelloWorld folder that you have created.

Projects_086

Create Request Handler

Double-click the HelloWorld folder to open the folder.
Right-click in the folder area to display the context menu.
Click Empty File from the context menu.

HelloWorld_087

Name the file as

HelloWorld.py

Your HelloWorld folder should look like the below:

HelloWorld_088

Right-click the HelloWorld.py file that you just created to display its context menu.
Click Open with Text Editor from the context menu to edit the file.
This will open the file in your configured text editor. By default, this should be gedit.

HelloWorld_090

Copy and paste the below into the file.

import webapp2

class MainPage(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        self.response.headers['Content-Type'] = 'text/plain'
        self.response.write('Hello, World!')

application = webapp2.WSGIApplication([
    ('/', MainPage),
], debug=True)

After you paste the above content into the file, it should look like the below.
Note the amount of space used for indentation.
This is important in Python as indentation is used to indicate code blocks.

Click on Save on the toolbar to save the file.

HelloWorld.py (~-Projects-HelloWorld) - gedit_092

Create Configuration File

In your HelloWorld folder, right-click in the folder area to display the context menu.
Click Empty File from the context menu.

HelloWorld_093

Name this file

app.yaml

HelloWorld_095

Right-click the app.yaml file that you just created to display its context menu.
Click Open with Text Editor from the context menu to edit the file.

HelloWorld_096

Copy and paste the below into the file, replacing the your-app-id with the project id that you defined in your Google Developers Console.

application: your-app-id
version: 1
runtime: python27
api_version: 1
threadsafe: true

handlers:
- url: /.*
  script: HelloWorld.application

Now, you are ready to test the project.

Test Project

To test your project, open a terminal session and go to the folder that holds your project folder.
For my example, my HelloWorld project is created in a folder call Projects in my home folder.
So I would type the following command after starting the terminal session.

cd Projects

If I list the contents of the Projects folder, it should look like the below:

zhixian@SARA: ~-Projects_105

To run the HelloWorld application,

  1. Enter the following at the command prompt:

    dev_appserver.py HelloWorld/

  2. You will be prompt to give permission for the dev_appserver script to check for updates on startup.
    Enter “n” to disallow this check. Leaving this as “Y” or blank will allow dev_appserver to check for updates.
  3. Note the url of the “default” module.
    This is the url that your application is being hosted at.
    By default it is:

    http://localhost:8080

  4. Note the url of the admin server.
    This is the url that of the local testing administration server to your application.
    By default it is:

    http://localhost:8000

zhixian@SARA: ~-Projects_104

If you open your browser and navigate to the url of the “default” module (http://localhost:8080), you should see:

Firefox Developer Edition_107

If you open your browser and navigate to the url of the admin server (http://localhost:8000), you should see:

Instances - Firefox Developer Edition_108

To stop the test server, press <Control>-<C> keys combination.

zhixian@SARA: ~-Projects_109

Deploy Project

To upload the project to Google:

  1. Enter the following command at the command prompt:

    appcfg.py update HelloWorld/

  2. Enter your Google (gmail) account.
  3. Enter the password to your account.
  4. After the update has complete, you should see “Deployment Success”, somewhere near the end.

zhixian@SARA: ~-Projects_110

After you have deployed the application, you can access it at:

http://<project-id>.appspot.com/

Firefox Developer Edition_111

Reference

  1. Hello, World! – Python – Google Cloud Platform
  2. Uploading Your Application – Python – Google Cloud Platform

2014-12-17

How to install Microsoft TrueType Core Fonts for the Web in Ubuntu

Microsoft had release some fonts for use with Internet web pages.
These fonts are generally designed to be legible on screen and hence theoretically suitable for anything viewed on screen.

Summary

  1. Installation
  2. Verify

Installation

These fonts can be installed via Ubuntu Software Center (search term: ttf-ms).

After you entered the search term, click on the item labeled Installer for Microsoft TyueType core fonts.
Click on the Install button to initiate the installation process.

Ubuntu Software Center_064

After you clicked on the Install button, an EULA (End User License Agreement) dialog will appear shortly.
Checked the check box to agree with the terms and click on the Forward button to proceed the installation process.

Debconf on SARA_066

After a short while, the fonts would have been installed.

Ubuntu Software Center_067

Verify

This fonts installation page will add the following fonts into your system:

  1. Andale Mono
  2. Arial
  3. Arial Black
  4. Comic Sans MS
  5. Courier New
  6. Georgia
  7. Impact
  8. Times New Roman
  9. Trebuchet MS
  10. Verdana
  11. Webdings

To check the fonts installed on your system, you can use the Font Viewer that comes with Ubuntu.
The Font Viewer can be accessed via Applications > Accessories > Font Viewer from the desktop menu.

Workspace 1_068

Note that in some cases, you may see a repeated entry as with the Andale Mono font shown below.

Font Viewer_069

This is normal.
The cause of this duplication is because in the installation folder (/usr/share/fonts/truetype/msttcorefonts by default) contains links that back point to the font file.
When using font viewer to view fonts, it read the link as a separate font. Hence the double count.

zhixian@SARA: -usr-share-fonts-truetype-msttcorefonts_070

2014-12-16

How to install and setup Yandex Disk on Ubuntu

This blog post is about installing and configuring Yandex.Disk, a cloud storage service.

Summary

  1. Assumptions
  2. Installation
  3. Configuration
  4. Launch on startup

Assumptions

This application is priced at $0.
As such, installation requires the use of an Ubuntu One account.
It is assumed that you have such an account.

It is also assumed that you have a Yandex account to use this service.
At this time of writing, the service remains free.

Installation

Yandex.Disk can be installed via Ubuntu Software Center (search term: yandex).
Click on the More Info button to view details.

Ubuntu Software Center_052

In the software description page, click on the Buy button.
At this time of writing, its priced at $0.

Ubuntu Software Center_053

After you pressed Buy, there will be a Terms of Use dialog.
Click on the Accept button to accept the terms of use.

Terms of Use_054

After you clicked on the Accept button, you need to log in to your Ubuntu One account.

Ubuntu Software Center_055

After you entered your credentials and log in to your Ubuntu One account, the installation for the application should proceed accordingly.
After the installation has complete, you should be able to access it from the desktop menu:
Applications > Internet > Yandex Disk

Workspace 1_058

After you click on the menu item, it will start a console session describing the usage of Yandex Disk command, yandex-disk.

zhixian@SARA: ~_059

Configuration

To setup your Yandex Disk, type the following command in the Yandex Disk console session:

yandex-disk setup

The setup process will prompt you for:

  1. Your proxy server information
    (I entered “N” as I do not use a proxy server)
  2. Credentials to your Yandex account
  3. Path to a folder on your local disk to store your Yandex Disk files.
    (I left this field as blank to use the default proposed path)
  4. Whether to start Yandex Disk on startup
    (I entered “Y” to start Yandex Disk on startup)

zhixian@SARA: ~_062

After setup is done, the background (daemon) process will begin to synchonize files from your Yandex Disk in the cloud to the path that you defined above in point 3 (/home/zhixian/Yandex.Disk).

When you examine the folder after a short while, you should see files in your Yandex Disk appearing in the folder.

Yandex.Disk_063

Launch on startup

When doing the setup, you might have indicated that you would like Yandex Disk to launch on startup.
As of this writing, this may not be working correctly.
To remedy this:

Go to the System > Control Center on the desktop menu.

Workspace 1_074

In the Control Center window, click on Startup Applications. to open the Startup Applications Preferences dialog.

Control Center_076

In the dialog, click Yandex.Disk in the lists of additional startup programs.
Then click on Edit button to open the Edit Startup Program dialog.

Startup Applications Preferences_082

In the Edit Startup Program dialog, change the command from:

yandex-disk start

to

/opt/yandex-disk/yandex-disk start

Edit Startup Program_081

After you click Save to close the dialog, Yandex Disk should launch on startup correctly now.

2014-12-04

Google App Engine development on Ubuntu for Python (Part 1 of 2)

Filed under: development — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Zhixian @ 12:21:12 pm

This blog post describes how to run Google App Engine (GAE for short) on Ubuntu.
This is a 2-part blog post.

Parts

  1. Setting up Google App Engine SDK (this article)
  2. Running Google App Engine

An aside related article, How to Add Google App Engine project to Google Developers Console.

Part 1 Summary

  1. Introduction
  2. Assumptions
  3. Python Version
  4. Installing Google App Engine

1. Introduction

Google App Engine is a PaaS (Platform as a Service) provided by Google.
Currently, GAE supports 4 programming languages.
I will be using Python as programming language of choice for this blog post.

2. Assumptions

In following this blog post, I assume:

  1. you have a working Google account
  2. you know how to start a terminal session and enter commands into it.
  3. you know how to use a browser to download files
  4. you know how to extract files from archives

Note: It may be obvious, but any time you see my name “zhixian” in any of screen shots or commands, you can safely assume that its should be referring to your username in your context.

3. Python Version

By default, Python is installed on Ubuntu.

The version of Python that I am using for this blog post is 2.7.6.
To check which version of Python you are running, typed the following command in a terminal session:

python –version

zhixian@SARA: ~_022

4. Installing Google App Engine

2 steps:

  1. Getting Google App Engine SDK (Software Development Kit)
  2. Extracting files from Google App Engine SDK
  3. (Optional) Move extracted files out of Downloads folder
  4. (Optional) Add location of extracted files to PATH environment variable

4.1 Getting Google App Engine SDK (Software Development Kit)

You can download the Google App Engine SDK at https://cloud.google.com/appengine/downloads

Steps:

  1. Enter the url https://cloud.google.com/appengine/downloads in your browser navigation bar.
  2. On the download page, click on the button “Google App Engine SDK for Python” to display the available download options
  3. Pick the link “google_appengine_1.9.15.zip” under package column for “Linux/Other Platforms” row to download the zip file.

Download the Google App Engine SDK - Google App Engine — Google Cloud Platform - Mozilla Firefox_023

4.2 Extracting files from Google App Engine SDK

After you have download the zip file, you should see the zip file in your download folder.

Downloads_025

Right-click on the zip file to display it’s context menu.
From the context menu, select “Extract Here”.

Downloads_026

After you extracted the files, you should see:

Downloads_027

I will refer to the location of google_appengine folder as GAE home directory for the rest of this blog post.

4.3 (Optional) Move extracted files out of Downloads folder

This step is optional and is entirely opinionated. It may not be appropriate for enterprise deployment.

The files that we extracted are in the default “Download” folder.
This folder may get cluttered over time.
My preference is to create a “Apps” directory and move the extracted files into this folder.
So, my final setup is something like the below:

Apps_028

google_appengine_030

4.4 (Optional) Add location of extracted files to PATH environment variable

This step is intended to provide convenience. It is not essential.

The location of the extracted files is dependent on whether you performed the previous step.

If you performed the previous step and moved the folder to an Apps folder, the location should be:
~/Apps/google_appengine

If you did not do the step, the location should be:
~/Downloads/google_appengine

As such, type the following:

export PATH=$PATH:<location_of_google_appengine>

Before you enter the following command, to examine the contents of your current PATH environment variable:

echo $PATH

zhixian@SARA: ~_032

After you enter the export PATH command, you should see a result like the below:

zhixian@SARA: ~_033

Note: Performing this command only affects the PATH environment variable for this session.
This means that every time you start a new terminal session, you have to do the same thing.
You may want to consider putting this in your .bashrc file.

I’m kind of lazy to explain what is the .bashrc file. So I’m just going to paste the screenshots of the steps for editing the .bashrc file with annotations:

At the command-line type the following command to edit the file:

pico ~/.bashrc

zhixian@SARA: ~_044

Note: pico is an alias for nano, a text-editor.

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After you have opened the file for editing, scroll to the end of the file using the down arrow or page down key:

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At the end of the file, enter the export PATH command.
Then press the <CTRL>-X key combination on your keyboard to exit the editor.

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Because we did not save changes when we exit the editor, there will be a prompt asking if you want to save changes.
Press the Y key on your keyboard to save changes.

zhixian@SARA: ~_048

After you enter Y, there will be another prompt for the file to save the changes.
Press the Enter key on your keyboard to accept the default (the name of the file you are editing).

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After you hit the Enter key, you should be back at the command-line.

To test the changes are effective, start another terminal session.
At the command-line, enter dev_a followed by the Tab key on your keyboard:

dev_a<tab>

The terminal session should automatically auto-complete your input into dev_appserver.py.

zhixian@SARA: ~_051

I will continue on how you get your first application running on Google App Engine in my next blog-post.

2014-12-02

How to install PHP to Apache HTTP Server in Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr)

Filed under: php, web application development — Tags: , , , , , , — Zhixian @ 10:36:12 am

This blog post describes how I install PHP to Apache HTTP Server and test the installation on my Ubuntu installation.

Steps

  1. Installation
  2. Verifying PHP5 Modules in Apache2 HTTP Folder
  3. Testing installation

Installation

The quick and simple way is to use Ubuntu Software Center (search term: php5).
This will install the latest version of PHP5 available in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Ubuntu Software Center_010

Verifying PHP5 Modules in Apache2 HTTP Folder

After the installation is complete, you should see Apache HTTP modules for PHP in the mods-enabled folder.
By default (if you installed Apache HTTP server via Ubuntu Software Center), the installation folder is located at:

/etc/apache2

In the installation folder, there should be a folder labeled mods-enabled.
In this folder, you should see a php5.conf (that holds your configuration settings for PHP5) and php5.load (the actual Apache2 module for PHP5) file.

zhixian@SARA: -etc-apache2-mods-enabled_011

Testing installation

After you confirmed that PHP module is enabled in PHP, you can test your installation.
To do so, create a test.php file in Apache’s document root folder.
By default, the document root folder is located in /var/www/html.
However, the owner and group access for this folder belongs to the root user.

html Properties_013

This means you need to access the /var/www/html folder as a superuser in order to make changes to the folder.
One way would be start a terminal session and enter the following commands:

gksudo caja /var/www/html &

zhixian@SARA: ~_015

If you are not using Mate desktop, replace “caja” with “nautilus” as in:

gksudo nautilus /var/www/html &

This command can be explained as follows:

gksudo – run command as superuser. This is similar to the sudo command. But because we are running the command in the background (see & below), the prompt to allow us to enter administrator’s credentials will be in the background as well. By using gksudo, we will get a prompt like the below, that allows us to enter administrator’s password.

Workspace 1_016

caja (or nautilus) – command to activate your file manager

/var/www/html – parameter used by file manager. File manager use this parameter and open this folder when it start.

& – The ampersand indicates that this command is to run in the background. If this is missing, the terminal session will be dedicated to run the file manager until the file manager application terminated.

After you run the command, you should see:

html (as superuser)_017

In this folder, create a file call test.php with the following contents:

<html>
<head>
<title>PHP Test Page</title>
</head>
<body>
<h2>A PHP test page</h2>
<?php echo “hello world”; ?>
</body>
</html>

test.php (-var-www-html) - gedit (as superuser)_018

Now, your /var/www/html folder should look something like this:

html (as superuser)_020

Go to your browser and navigate to:

http://localhost/test.php

You should see a result like the below:

PHP Test Page - Google Chrome_021

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